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J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury

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Volume 26(2); June 2013
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Original Articles
Relationship of Mean Arterial Pressure with the Adverse Outcomes in Adult Blunt Trauma Patients: Cross-sectional Study
Seung Yong Cha, Yong Hwan Kim, Chong Kun Hong, Jun Ho Lee, Kwang Won Cho, Seong Youn Hwang, Kyoung Yul Lee, Younghwan Lee, Seong Hee Choi
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(2):39-46.
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  • 11 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Non-invasive blood pressure measurement is widely used as a pre-hospital triage tool for blunt trauma patients. However, scant data exits for using the mean arterial pressure (MAP), compared to the systolic blood pressure, as a guiding index. The aim of this study was to determine the association between adverse outcomes and mean arterial pressure (MAP) and to exhibit the therapeutic range of the MAP in adult blunt trauma patients.
METHODS
The electronic medical records for all trauma patients in a single hospital from January 2010 to September 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients below 17 years of age, patients with penetrating injuries, and patients with serious head trauma (injuries containing any skull fractures or any intracranial hemorrhages) were excluded. Adverse outcomes were defined as one of the following: death in the Emergency Department (ED), admission via operating theater, admission to the intensive care unit, transfer to another hospital for emergency surgery, or discharge as hopeless.
RESULTS
There were 14,537 patients who met entry criteria. Adverse outcomes occurred for MAPs in range from 90 to 120 mmHg. Adverse outcomes were found, after adjusting for confounding variables, to occur increasingly as the MAP declined below 90 mmHg or rose above 120 mmHg.
CONCLUSION
Not only lower but also higher mean arterial pressure is associated with increased adverse outcomes in adult blunt trauma patients. Thus, patients with a MAP above 120 mmHg should be considered as a special group requiring higher medical attention, just as those with a MAP below 90 mmHg are.
Summary
Why do Multiple-trauma Patients Stay Longer in the Intensive Care Unit?; A Comparison of Injury Severity Score and The Number of Injured Regions
Mu Jin Jo, Seong Hwa Lee, Seok Ju Cho, Seok Ran Yeom, Sang Kyoon Han, Sung Wook Park, Dae Seop Lee
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(2):47-52.
  • 1,068 View
  • 12 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Injury severity score (ISS), a widely used scoring system, is used to define the severity of trauma in multiple-trauma patients. Nevertheless, ISS cut-off value for predicting the outcome of multiple-trauma patients has not been confirmed. Thus, this study was performed to determine the more useful method for predicting the outcome for multiple-trauma patients: the ISS or the number of anatomical Abbreviated injury scale (AIS) injury regions.
METHODS
For 195 consecutive patients who a regional emergency medical center, we analyzed the ISS and the number of anatomical AIS injury region. The patients were divided into four groups based on the ISS and the number of anatomical AIS regions. We compared intensive-care-unit (ICU) admission days and hospitalization days and ICU stay ratio (ICU admission days/hospitalization days) between the four groups.
RESULTS
In the groups with an ISS more than 17, the results were not significantly different statistically the group with 2 anatomical AIS injury regions and more than 3 anatomical AIS injury regions. Also, in the group with an ISS of 17 or less, the results were the same as those for patients with an ISS more than 17 (p>0.05). Among the patients with 2 anatomical AIS injury regions, patients with an ISS more than 17 patients had more ICU admission days and a higher ICU stay ratio than patients with an ISS 17 or less. Also, Among the patients with 3 anatomical AIS injury regions, the results were the same as those for patients with 2 anatomical AIS injury regions.
CONCLUSION
Patients with high ISS, regardless of the number of anatomical AIS injury regions had significantly longer ICU stays and higher ICU admission ratio. Thus, the ISS may be a better method than the number of anatomical AIS injury regions for predicting the outcomes for multiple-trauma patients.
Summary
Case Reports
Traumatic Perforation of the Duodenal Diverticulum: A Case Report
Ho Hyun Kim, Yun Chul Park, Dong Kyu Lee, Chan Yong Park, Jae Hun Kim, Yeong Dae Kim, Jung Chul Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(2):53-57.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
A duodenal diverticulum is a frequent abnormality that is usually diagnosed incidentally. Clinical manifestations usually mimic those of highly-varied entities. Among the complications of a duodenal diverticulum, perforation is fairly rare; rupture due to blunt trauma is even rarer, and no cases have been reported in Korean literature. We report the case of a 61-year-old male patient who presented with a perforated duodenal diverticulum after a blunt trauma. We also review the existing literature.
Summary
Cerebral Fat Embolism after Traumatic Multiple Fracture: A Case Report
Ho Hyun Kim, Yun Chul Park, Dong Kyu Lee, Chan Yong Park, Jae Hun Kim, Yeong Dae Kim, Jung Chul Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2013;26(2):58-62.
  • 1,209 View
  • 8 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
A cerebral fat embolism is an uncommon but serious complication of long bone fracture. It can be fatal, and early detection is not easy. Neurologic symptoms are variable, and the clinical diagnosis is difficult. The pathogenesis remains controversial, and several theories have been proposed. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect a cerebral fat embolism with a higher sensitivity than cerebral computed tomography. We report a case of a post-traumatic cerebral fat embolism without pulmonary involvement and review the existing literature.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury