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3 "Ae Jin Sung"
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Case Report
Salvation of a solitary kidney in a patient with grade IV renal trauma: a case report
Hyuntack Shin, Ae Jin Sung, Min A Lee, Jayun Cho, Gil Jae Lee, Byungchul Yu, Kang Kook Choi
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(Suppl 1):S18-S22.   Published online June 17, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0091
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AbstractAbstract PDF
There are many reasons for solitary kidney. Congenital causes include renal agenesis and dysplasia. Acquired causes include nephrectomy performed for reasons including traumatic kidney injury, disease (e.g., renal cell carcinoma), and donation for kidney transplantation. According to the European Association of Urology, the World Society of Emergency Surgery, and the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma guidelines, it is important to preserve the remaining renal function as much as possible when a solitary kidney patient has suffered a traumatic kidney injury. The authors present a case of kidney preservation in a solitary kidney patient with a traumatic grade IV renal injury through non-operative management involving superselective renal artery angioembolization.
Summary
Original Articles
Relation between Location of Pelvic bone Fractures and the Injury to the Urinary bladder, Urethra or Lower gastrointestinal tract
Chang Ho Kim, Jung Bae Park, Hyun Wook Ryoo, Kang Suk Seo, Jun Seok Seo, Jae Myung Chung, Dong Wook Je, Ae Jin Sung
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2007;20(2):90-95.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
This research was conducted to study whether the specific location of pelvic-bone fractures could increase the risk for injury to the urinary bladder, urethra, or lower gastrointestinal tract.
METHODS
We retrospectively reviewed the data of 234 patients with pelvic-bone fractures who visited the emergency department of Kyungpook National University Hospital from January 2004 to December 2006. The location of the pelvic-bone fracture was divided into 8 parts. The association of fracture location with injury to the urinary bladder, urethra, or lower gastrointestinal tract was analyzed with Fisher's-exact test and multiple logistic regression.
RESULTS
Nineteen(19) patients had urinary bladder injury, 8 had urethral injury, and 9 had lower gastrointestinal tract injury. The following fracture locations were found to be significant; urinary bladder: sacroiliac (SI) joint (p<0.001), symphysis pubis (p=0.011), and sacrum (p=0.005); urethra: SI joint (p=0.020); lower gastrointestinal tract: symphysis pubis (p=0.028). After the multiple logistic regression analysis, the primary and the independent predictors for each of the injuries were as follows; urinary bladder: sacroiliac joint (p=0.000, odds ratio [OR]=10.469); lower gastrointestinal tract: symphysis pubis (p=0.037, OR=7.009).
CONCLUSION
Consideration of further workup for injuries to the lower gastrointestinal and urinary tract is needed for some locations of pelvic-bone fractures because certain pelvic-bone fracture locations, especially the sacroiliac joint and the symphysis pubis, are associated with increased risk for injury to the lower gastrointestinal and urinary tracts.
Summary
Predictive Factors for Cervical Spine Injury in Patients with Minor Head Injury
Chul Woo Park, Ae Jin Sung, Jun Ho Lee, Seong Youn Hwang
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2009;22(2):154-160.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
This study aimed to determine new criteria for detecting independent factors with high sensitivity in cases of cervical spine injury. We compared the sensitivity, the specificity, and the false negative predictive value (NPV) of plain radiographs with those of computed tomography for cervical spine injury in patients with minor head injury.
METHODS
We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 357 patients who underwent both cervical plain radiographs and computer tomography from January 2006, to September 2008. Patients were divided into two groups: the cervical spine injury group and the no cervical spine injury group. New criteria were organized based on variables that had significant differences in the logistic regression test.
RESULTS
Among the 357 patients, 78 patients had cervical spine injuries. The average age was 43.9+/-15.2 yrs old, and the male-to-female ratio was 1.90. The most common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accidents. There was a significant difference in loss of consciousness, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS)=14, neurologic deficit, posterior neck tenderness, and abnormality of the cervical plain radiographs between the two groups on the logistic regression test. New criteria included the above five variables. If a patient has at least variable, the area under the ROC curve of the new criteria was 0.850, and the sensitivity and the false NPV were 87.2% and 5.2%, respectively.
CONCLUSION
New criteria included loss of consciousness, GCS=14, neurologic deficit, posterior neck tenderness, and abnormality of the cervical plain radiographs. If the patient had at least 1 variable, he or she could have a of cervical spine injury with a sensitivity of 87.2% and a false NPV of 5.2%.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury