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4 "Nak-Jun Choi"
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Case Report
An unstable patient with a large sucking chest wound managed with gauze packing for preventing tension and bleeding control before surgery in Korea: a case report
Chang-Sin Lee, Min-Jeong Cho, Tae-Wook Noh, Nak-Jun Choi, Jun-Min Cho
Received September 18, 2023  Accepted November 29, 2023  Published online February 23, 2024  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0066    [Epub ahead of print]
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  • 7 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
This case report describes the management of a 51-year-old female patient who arrived at the emergency room with a stab wound to the upper right chest. Immediate medical interventions were undertaken, including blood transfusions and endotracheal intubation. To prevent tension and control bleeding, gauze packing was applied directly through the large open wound. Further surgical exploration identified a laceration in the lung, necessitating a right upper lobe resection. Postoperatively, the patient's vital signs stabilized, and she was subsequently discharged without complications. This case highlights the decision-making process in selecting between an emergency department thoracotomy and an operating room thoracotomy for patients with penetrating chest trauma. It also illustrates the role of gauze packing in managing tension and hemorrhage. In summary, gauze packing can be an effective interim measure for stabilizing patients with traumatic injuries, unstable vital signs, and large open chest wounds, particularly when a chest tube is already in place, to prevent tension and facilitate bleeding control prior to surgical intervention.
Summary
Original Articles
The impact of COVID-19 on trauma patients and orthopedic trauma operations at a single focused training center for trauma in Korea
Wonseok Choi, Hanju Kim, Whee Sung Son, Seungyeob Sakong, Jun-Min Cho, Nak-Jun Choi, Tae-Wook Noh, Namryeol Kim, Jae-Woo Cho, Jong-Keon Oh
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(3):195-201.   Published online December 1, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0078
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  • 67 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

The objective of this study was to determine the effects of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on the volume of trauma patients, the number of orthopedic trauma operations, and the severity of injuries. We also investigated the correlations between social distancing and these variables.

Methods

This was a retrospective review of trauma patient cases at a single focused training center for trauma in Korea from January 2017 to April 2021. The COVID-19 group included patients treated from January 1 to April 30 in 2020 and 2021, and the control group included patients treated during the same months from 2017 to 2019. The volume of trauma patients according to the level of social distancing was evaluated among patients treated from August 2, 2020 to November 23, 2020.

Results

The study included 3,032 patients who presented to the emergency department with traumatic injuries from January to April 2017 to 2021. The average number of patients was 646.7 and 546.0 in the control and COVID-19 groups, respectively. The percentage of patients injured in traffic accidents (TAs) decreased from 25.0% to 18.2% (p<0.0001). The proportions of in-car TAs and pedestrian TAs also decreased from 6.7% and 10.8% to 3.5% and 6.0%, respectively (p=0.0002 and p<0.0001). The percentage of bicycle TAs increased from 2.4% to 4.0% (p=0.0128). The proportion of patients with an Injury Severity Score above 15 and the mortality rate did not change significantly. As the level of social distancing increased, the number of trauma patients and the number of trauma injuries from TAs decreased. The number of orthopedic trauma operations also depended on the social distancing level.

Conclusions

The number of trauma patients presenting to the emergency department decreased during the COVID-19 period. The volume of trauma patients and orthopedic trauma operations decreased as the social distance level increased.

Summary
Percutaneous two unilateral iliosacral S1 screw fixation for pelvic ring injuries: a retrospective review of 38 patients
Whee Sung Son, Jae-Woo Cho, Nam-Ryeol Kim, Jun-Min Cho, Nak-Jun Choi, Jong-Keon Oh, HanJu Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(1):34-42.   Published online November 3, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0075
  • 4,174 View
  • 88 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Percutaneous iliosacral (IS) screw fixation for pelvic ring injuries is a minimally invasive technique that reduces the amount of blood loss and shortens the procedure time. Moreover, two unilateral IS S1 screws exhibit superior stability to a single IS screw and are also safer for neurological injuries than an S2 screw. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate fixation using percutaneous two unilateral IS S1 screws for pelvic ring injuries and its subsequent clinical outcomes. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 38 patients who underwent percutaneous two unilateral IS S1 screw fixation for pelvic ring injuries. The procedure time, blood loss, achievement of bone union, radiological outcomes (Matta and Tornetta grade), and postoperative complications were evaluated. Results: The mean procedure time, hemoglobin loss, bone union rate, and time to union were 40.1 minutes (range, 18–102), 0.6 g/dL (range, 0.3–1.0), 100%, and 153.2 days (range, 61–327), respectively. The Matta and Tornetta grades were excellent, good, and fair in 24 (63.1%), 11 (28.9%), and 3 patients (7.9%), respectively, and the postoperative complications were S1 screw loosening, widening of the symphysis pubis (2.3 and 2.5 mm), lumbosacral plexopathy, and S1 radiculopathy in one (2.6%), two (5.3%), one (2.6%), and one patient (2.6%), respectively. However, all neurological complications recovered spontaneously. Conclusions: Percutaneous two unilateral IS S1 screw fixation was useful for treating pelvic ring injuries. In particular, it involved a short procedure time with little blood loss and also led to 100% bone union and good radiological outcomes.
Summary
The Effects of a Trauma Team Approach on the Management of Open Extremity Fractures in Polytrauma Patients: A Retrospective Comparative Study
Seungyeob Sakong, Eic Ju Lim, Jun-Min Cho, Nak-Jun Choi, Jae-Woo Cho, Jong-Keon Oh
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(2):105-111.   Published online March 15, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.0043
  • 9,632 View
  • 112 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

Open extremity fractures require prompt antibiotic medication and initial debridement surgery to reduce the infection rate and restore functional stabilization. We aimed to report the effects and positive outcomes of a trauma team approach on the management of open extremity fractures in polytrauma patients.

Methods

This retrospective review included all polytrauma patients with open extremity fractures admitted between March 2009 and December 2019. Patients were divided into two groups according to whether they were treated before or after the implementation of the trauma team approach (March 2014). We analyzed the outcomes in each group with respect to the time interval until the doctor’s arrival, total length of stay in the emergency department, the time interval until initial antibiotic treatment and operation, whether the initial operation was performed within 24 hours, and the rate of deep infections.

Results

A total of 123 patients met the inclusion criteria. There were no statistically significant differences in demographic characteristics. The time interval until the doctor’s arrival (64.12±49.2 minutes vs. 19.82±15.23 minutes; p=0.035) and initial antibiotic treatment (115.47±72.12 minutes vs. 48.78±30.12 minutes; p=0.023) significantly improved after implementing the trauma team approach. The union rate was not significantly different. However, the time interval until initial debridement, opportunity for initial debridement within 24 hours, and the rate of deep infections demonstrated better results.

Conclusions

The reduced time interval until initial antibiotic treatment and debridement could be attributed to the positive effect of the trauma team approach on the management of open extremity fractures in polytrauma patients.

Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury