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7 "Abdominal injury"
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Case Reports
Thoracoabdominal injury with evisceration from a chainsaw assault: a case report
Babatunde Abayomi Salami, Babatunde Adeteru Ayoade, El-Zaki Abdullahi Shomoye, Chigbundu Collins Nwokoro
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(2):118-122.   Published online May 11, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0012
  • 5,396 View
  • 75 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The usual cause of penetrating thoracoabdominal injuries with evisceration are stab wounds with knives and other sharp weapons used during fights and conflicts. Evisceration of the abdominal viscera as a result of trauma, with its attendant morbidity and mortality, requires early intervention. Gunshot wounds can also cause penetrating thoracoabdominal injuries. We report the case of a 52-year-old male patient, a worker at a timber-processing factory, who was assaulted with a chainsaw by his colleague following a disagreement. He was seen at the accident and emergency department of our hospital with a thoracoabdominal injury about 1.5 hours after the attack. He had a left thoracoabdominal laceration with abdominal evisceration and an open left pneumothorax. He was managed operatively, made a full recovery, and was discharged 16 days after admission. He was readmitted 4 months after the initial surgery with acute intestinal obstruction secondary to adhesions. He underwent exploratory laparotomy and adhesiolysis. He made an uneventful recovery and was discharged on the ninth postoperative day for subsequent follow-up.
Summary
Non-Operative Management of Traumatic Gallbladder Bleeding with Cystic Artery Injury: A Case Report
Tae Hoon Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(3):208-211.   Published online August 19, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0003
  • 2,642 View
  • 67 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

Gallbladder injuries are rare in cases of blunt abdominal trauma and are usually associated with damage to other internal organs. If the physician does not suspect gallbladder injury and check imaging studies carefully, it may be difficult to distinguish a gallbladder injury from gallbladder stone, hematoma, or bleeding. Therefore, in order not to miss the diagnosis, the clinical findings and correlation should be confirmed. In the present case, a 60-year-old male presented to a local trauma center complaining of pain in the upper right quadrant and chest wall following a motor vehicle collision. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed a hepatic laceration and hematoma in the parenchyma in segments 4, 5, and 6 and active bleeding in the lumen of the gallbladder. Traumatic gallbladder injuries generally require surgery, but in this case, non-operative management was possible with cautious follow-up consisting of abdominal CT and angiography with repeated physical examinations and hemodynamic monitoring in the intensive care unit.

Summary
Nonoperative Treatment for Abdominal Injury in Multiple Trauma Patients: Experience in the Metropolitan Tertiary Hospital in Korea (2009~2014)
Seung Young Oh, Gil Joon Suh
J Trauma Inj. 2015;28(4):284-291.   Published online December 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2015.28.4.284
  • 1,548 View
  • 6 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The aim of this study is to present a nonoperative treatment for abdominal injuries in patients with multiple traumas and to discuss the role of metropolitan tertiary hospital, non-regional trauma centers. We collected data from patients with multiple traumas including abdominal injuries from 2009 to 2014. Patient characteristics, associated injuries, short-term outcomes and departments that managed the patients overall were analyzed. Based on treatment modalities for abdominal injury, patients were divided into two groups: the operative treatment group and the nonoperative treatment group. We compared differences in patient characteristics, injury mechanisms, initial vital signs, detailed injury types, lengths of hospital and ICU stays. Of the 167 patients with multiple traumas, abdominal injuries were found in 57 patients. The injury mechanism for 44 patients (77.2%) was traffic accidents, and associated extra-abdominal injuries were shown in 45 patients (78.9%). The mean lengths of hospital and ICU stays for the 57 patients were 36.4 days and 8.3 days, respectively. The in-hospital mortality rate was 8.8%. Ten patients (17.5%) were treated operatively, and 47 patients (82.5%) were treated nonoperatively. Among the 47 patients in the nonoperative treatment group, 17 patients received embolization, and 3 patients underwent a percutaneous drainage procedure. Operative treatments were used more in patients with injuries to the pancreas and bowel. No patient required additional surgery or died due to the failure of nonoperative treatment. No differences in the clinical characteristics except for the detailed injury type were observed between the two groups. In appropriately selected patients with multiple traumas including abdominal injuries, nonoperative treatment is a safe and feasible. For rapid and accurate managements of these patients, well-trained trauma surgeons who can manage problems with the various systems in the human body and who can decide whether nonoperative treatment is appropriate or not are required.
Summary
A Case of Tension Viscerothorax: A Rare Complication of Diaphragmatic Rupture after Blunt Abdominal Trauma
Maeng Real Park, Jae Ho Lee, Ji Yoon Ahn, Bum Jin Oh, Won Kim, Kyoung Soo Lim
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2006;19(2):201-205.
  • 1,010 View
  • 3 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Tension viscerothorax (gastrothorax) is rare life-threatening disease which is caused by air trapped in viscera. A distended viscera in the hemi-thorax shifts the mediastinal structures and causes extra-cardiac obstructive shock. A defective diaphragm is caused by abdominal trauma or a congenital anomaly. Traumatic diaphragmatic injury can be missed until herniation develops several years after blunt trauma. In our case, a 10-year old boy developed hemodynamic compromise in the emergency department. Three years earlier, he had suffered blunt abdominal trauma during a pedestrian traffic accident, but there was no evidence of diaphragmatic injury at that time. He was successfully resuscitated by gastric decompression and an emergent thoracic operation. The operation finding revealed a traumatic diaphragmatic injury. Tension viscerothorax is a rare, but catastrophic, condition, so we suggest that addition of tension viscerothorax to the Advanced Trauma and Life Support (ATLS) guidelines may be helpful.
Summary
Original Article
FAST Reappraisal: Cross-sectional Study
Sang Hyun Ha, Chong Kun Hong, Jun Ho Lee, Seong Youn Hwang, Seong Hee Choi
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2012;25(3):67-71.
  • 987 View
  • 8 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) provides an important initial screening examination in adult trauma patients. However, due to its low sensitivity, FAST is not a replacement for computed tomography (CT) in hemodynamically stable trauma patients. The aim of this study was to determine the test characteristics of FAST in adult, hemodynamically stable, blunt abdominal trauma patients by using a critical action as a reference standard.
METHODS
The medical records for FAST examination at a single hospital from January 2009 to February 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. The inclusion criterion was isolated, hemodynamically stable, blunt abdominal trauma. Hemodynamically unstable patients or patients with penetrating injuries were excluded. The reference standard was the presence of a critical action, which was defined as one of the following: 1) operative intervention for a finding discovered on CT, 2) interventional radiology for bleeding, 3) transfusion of 2 or more packed RBCs, or 4) death at the emergency department.
RESULTS
There were 230 patients who met the inclusion criterion. There were 20 true positive, 206 true negative, 0 false positive, and 4 false negative results. The sensitivity and the specificity were 83% and 100%, respectively.
CONCLUSION
Despite its low sensitivity for detecting any abnormal finding discovered on CT, negative FAST could aid to exclude critical action in hemodynamically stable, blunt abdominal trauma patients.
Summary
Case Report
Delayed Splenic Rupture Following Minor Trauma in a Patient with Underlying Liver Cirrhosis
Kyung Woon Jeung, Byung Kook Lee, Hyun Ho Ryu
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2011;24(1):52-55.
  • 1,057 View
  • 6 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The spleen is the most frequently injured organ following blunt abdominal trauma. However, delayed splenic rupture is rare. As the technical improvement of computed tomography has proceeded, the diagnosis of splenic injury has become easier than before. However, the diagnosis of delayed splenic rupture could be challenging if the trauma is minor and remote. We present a case of delayed splenic rupture in a patient with underlying liver cirrhosis. A 42-year-old male visited our emergency department with pain in the lower left chest following minor blunt trauma. Initial physical exam and abdominal sonography revealed only liver cirrhosis without traumatic injury. On the sixth day after trauma, he complained of abdominal pain and diarrhea after eating snacks. The patient was misdiagnosed as having acute gastroenteritis until he presented with symptoms of shock. Abdominal sonography and computed tomography revealed the splenic rupture. The patient underwent a splenectomy and then underwent a second operation due to postoperative bleeding 20 hours after the first operation. The patient was discharged uneventfully 30 days after trauma. In the present case, the thrombocytopenia and splenomegaly due to liver cirrhosis are suspected of being risk factors for the development of delayed splenic rupture. The physician should keep in mind the possibility of delayed splenic rupture following blunt abdominal or chest trauma.
Summary
Original Article
Prognostic Factors in Patients Who Performed Angiographic Embolization for the Bleeding from Injury of the Intraabdominal Organ and Pelvic Area
Jin Ho Lee, Ji Young Jang, Hong jin Shim, Jae Gil Lee
J Trauma Inj. 2012;25(4):166-171.
  • 1,018 View
  • 6 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
In patients with traumatic hemoperitoneum or pelvic bone fracture who underwent angiography and embolization, we want to find the prognostic factors related with mortality.
METHODS
Patients(333 patients) who visited our hospital with traumatic injury from March 2008 to April 2012 were included in this study. Only 37 patients with traumatic hemoperitoneum or pelvic bone fracture underwent angiography and embolization. A retrospective review was conducted, and Glasgow coma scale (GCS), Revised trauma score (RTS), Injury severity score (ISS), initial laboratory finding and time interval, the amount of transfusion from the arrival at the ER to the start of embolization, and the vital signs before and after procedure were checked. Stastical analysis was conducted using the Chi square and Mann-Whitney U test.
RESULTS
In univariate analysis, the amount of transfusion, the base deficit before procedure, the systolic blood pressure before and after the procedure, the GCS, the RTS and the ISS were significantly associated with prognosis. In the multivariate analysis, the ISS and the base deficit had significant association with prognosis. Of the 37 patients who underwent angiography and embolization, 31 patients needed not additional procedure (Group A) while the other 6 patients needed an additional procedure (Group B). After procedure, a statistically significant higher blood pressure was observed in Group A than in Group B. As to the difference in blood pressure before and after the procedure, a statistically significant decrease in systolic blood pressure was observed in Group B, but an increase was observed in Group A.
CONCLUSION
In traumatic hemoperitoneum or pelvic bone fracture patients who underwent angiography and embolization, GCS, ISS, RTS, transfusion amount before the procedure, initial base deficit and systolic blood pressure were factors related to mortality. When patients who underwent angiography and embolization only were compared with patients who underwent re-embolization or additional procedure after the first embolization, an increase in systolic blood pressure after embolization was a prognostic factor for successful control of bleeding.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury