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Case Reports
Incidental traumatic right diaphragmatic rupture: a missed case after trauma
Fatima Alharmoodi, Shadin Ghabra, Salem Alharthi
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(1):56-59.   Published online June 23, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2022.0008
  • 2,243 View
  • 52 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Traumatic diaphragmatic hernia is among the most uncommon conditions after severe trauma, and it is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis is difficult and might be missed, but a multimodal investigation might help in terms of diagnostic yield. In this case report, we present a missed right diaphragmatic rupture 14 years after the trauma.
Summary
Traumatic abdominal wall hernia with hemoperitoneum caused by blunt injury: laparoscopic exploration with mini-laparotomy repair. A case report
Euisung Jeong, Hyunseok Jang, Younggoun Jo, Yunchul Park, Naa Lee, Jungchul Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(1):61-65.   Published online December 23, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0062
  • 2,781 View
  • 68 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Traumatic abdominal wall hernia is a very rare clinical entity. Herein, we report the case of a patient who was transferred from a local clinic to the emergency department because of left lower abdominal pain. Initially, an intra-abdominal hematoma was observed on computed tomography and no extravasation was noted. Conservative treatment was initiated, and the patient’s symptoms were slightly relieved. However, though abdominal pain was relieved during the hospital stay, bowel herniation was suspected in the left periumbilical area. Follow-up computed tomography showed traumatic abdominal wall hernia with hemoperitoneum in the abdomen. We performed a laparoscopic exploration of the injury site and hernia lesion. The anterior abdominal wall hernia was successfully closed.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Unique laparoscopic emergency management of traumatic obstructed abdominal wall hernia: A case report and review of literature
    Arwa M Aljuhani, Ghaith A Al Saied, Arjmand Reyaz, Mohammed A Alkahlan, Ibrahim M Aljohani, Muhammed M Abukhater
    International Journal of Abdominal Wall and Hernia.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Article
Comparison of Penetrating and Blunt Traumatic Diaphragmatic Injuries
Sang Su Lee, Sung Youl Hyun, Hyuk Jun Yang, Yong Su Lim, Jin Seong Cho, Jae Hyug Woo
J Trauma Inj. 2019;32(4):210-219.   Published online December 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2019.034
  • 4,127 View
  • 96 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

Traumatic diaphragmatic injury (TDI) is no longer considered to be a rare condition in Korea. This study investigated differences in the prevalence of accompanying injuries and the prognosis in patients with traumatic diaphragmatic damage according to the mechanism of injury.

Methods

We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with TDI who were seen at a regional emergency medical center from January 2000 to December 2018. Among severe trauma patients with traumatic diaphragmatic damage, adults older than 18 years of age with a known mechanism of injury were included in this study. Surgery performed within 6 hours after the injury was sustained was defined as emergency surgery. We assessed the survival rate and likelihood of respiratory compromise according to the mechanism of injury.

Results

In total, 103 patients were analyzed. The patients were categorized according to whether they had experienced a penetrating injury or a blunt injury. Thirty-five patients had sustained a penetrating injury, and traffic accidents were the most common cause of blunt injuries. The location of the injury did not show a statistically significant difference between these groups. Severity of TDI was more common in the blunt injury group than in the penetrating injury group, and was also more likely in patients with respiratory compromise. However, sex, the extent of damage, and the initial Glasgow coma scale score had no significant relationship with severity.

Conclusions

Based on the findings of this study, TDI should be recognized and managed proactively in patients with blunt injury and/or respiratory compromise. Early recognition and implementation of an appropriate management strategy would improve patients’ prognosis. Multi-center, prospective studies are needed in the future.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • An audit of traumatic haemothoraces in a regional hospital in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
    CM Kithuka, VC Ntola, W Sibanda
    South African Journal of Surgery.2023; 61(3): 12.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with Successful Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery and Thoracotomy in the Management of Traumatic Hemothorax
    Heather M. Grant, Alexander Knee, Michael V. Tirabassi
    Journal of Surgical Research.2022; 269: 83.     CrossRef
Case Reports
Acute Pancreatitis after Additional Trauma in Chronic Traumatic Pancreatic Diaphragmatic Hernia
You Ho Mun, Sin Youl Park
J Trauma Inj. 2019;32(1):66-70.   Published online March 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2019.007
  • 3,332 View
  • 52 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

Traumatic diaphragmatic injuries (TDIs) are a rare complication in thoraco-abdominal trauma. The diagnosis is difficult and if left untreated, TDI can cause traumatic diaphragmatic hernia (TDH). Through an injured diaphragm, the liver, spleen, stomach, small intestine, and large intestine can be herniated to the thoracic cavity, but pancreatic herniation and pancreatitis are quite rare in TDH. This paper reports a case of pancreatitis developed by additional trauma in a patient with asymptomatic chronic TDH. A 58-year-old male visited the emergency department with a left abdominal injury after a fall 6 hours earlier. The vital signs were stable, but the amylase and lipase levels were elevated to 558 U/L and 1,664 U/L, respectively. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a left diaphragmatic hernia and an incarceration of the stomach, pancreatic ductal dilatation, and peripancreatic fatty infiltration. Additional history taking showed that he had suffered a fall approximately 20 years ago and had an accidentally diaphragmatic hernia through a chest CT 6 months earlier. A comparison with the previous CT revealed the pancreatitis to be caused by secondary pancreatic ductal obstruction due to the incarcerated stomach. For pancreatitis, gastrointestinal decompression was performed, and after 3 days, the pancreatic enzyme was normalized; hence, a thoracotomy was performed. A small ruptured diaphragm was found and reposition of the organs was performed. This paper reports the experience of successfully treating pancreatitis and pancreatic hernia developed after trauma without complications through a thoracotomy following gastrointestinal decompression.

Summary
Right Diaphragmatic Injury Accompanied by Herniation of the Liver: A Case Report
Min A Lee, Kang Kook Choi, Gil Jae Lee, Byung Chul Yu, Dae Sung Ma, Yang Bin Jeon, Jung Nam Lee, Min Chung
J Trauma Inj. 2016;29(2):43-46.   Published online June 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2016.29.2.43
  • 2,083 View
  • 15 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Traumatic diaphragmatic injury (TDI) occurs in 1% of patients of blunt abdominal trauma. Most TDIs involve the left diaphragm, however the authors experienced TDI accompanied by a liver laceration of the right diaphragm. When detected early, TDI can be easily treated, however serious complications can occur if not. When diaphragmatic injury is suspected due to clinical manifestation, comprehensive analysis of the patient data including radiologic findings is important.
Summary
Right Diaphragmatic Rupture after Blunt Trauma: Case Report
Ki Hoon Kim, Jin Su Kim, Sung Jin Park, Woon Won Kim, Do Kyun Kang, Ho Gi Min, Yong Han Kim, Cheol Gyu O
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2012;25(3):87-90.
  • 1,170 View
  • 1 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Blunt diaphragmatic rupture (BDR) is a relatively rare injury and occurs in 0.8% to 7% of all thorocoabdominal blunt trauma. Especially right diaphragmatic rupture after blunt abdominal trauma is a rarer than left. The diagnosis of BDR can be missed while evaluating the multiple trauma patient. Other severe injuries may mask BDR during the primary resuscitation and survey. We experienced two cases of traumatic rupture of right diaphragm, one diagnosed immediately and the other diagnosed delayed. In this paper we present two cases of traumatic diaphragmatic rupture.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury