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Original Articles
Characteristics of Traffic Accidents on Highways: An Analysis Based on Patients Treated at a Regional Trauma Center
Sung Yong Lee, Kyung Hoon Sun, Chan Yong Park, Tae Hoon Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(4):263-269.   Published online June 4, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.0063
  • 8,313 View
  • 94 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

There have been increasing concerns about serious traffic accidents on highways. The purpose of this study was to analyze factors affecting traffic accidents on highways and the severity of the resulting injuries.

Methods

This retrospective study was conducted at a regional trauma center. We reviewed 594 patients who had been in 114 traffic accidents on highways from January 2018 to June 2020. We collected demographic data, clinical data, accident-related factors, and meteorological data (weather and temperature).

Results

Environmental risk factors were found to be significantly associated with the incidence of traffic accidents on highways. Injury severity and the death rate were higher in sedans than in any other type of vehicle. Tunnels were the most common location of accidents, accounting for 47 accidents (41.2%) and 269 injured patients (45.3%). The injury severity of individuals riding in the driver’s seat (front seat) was high, regardless of vehicle type. Three meteorological risk factors were found to be significantly associated with traffic accidents: rainy roads (odds ratio [OR] 2.08; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.84–3.29; p=0.01), icy or snowy roads (OR 5.12; 95% CI 2.88–7.33; p<0.01), and foggy conditions (OR 2.94; 95% CI 2.15–4.03; p<0.05).

Conclusions

The injury severity of patients was affected by seat position and type of vehicle, and the frequency of accident was affected by the location. The incidence of traffic accidents was strongly influenced by meteorological conditions (rain, snow/ice, and fog).

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • What are the individual and joint impacts of key meteorological factors on the risk of unintentional injuries? A case-crossover study of over 147,800 cases from a sentinel-based surveillance system
    Xiao Lin, Tian Tian, Congxing Shi, Pengyu Wang, Shimin Chen, Tong Guo, Zhiqiang Li, Boheng Liang, Wangjian Zhang, Pengzhe Qin, Yuantao Hao
    Sustainable Cities and Society.2023; 91: 104413.     CrossRef
The Influence of Seasons and Weather on the Volume of Trauma Patients: 4 Years of Experience at a Single Regional Trauma Center
Se Heon Kim, Young Hoon Sul, Jin Young Lee, Joong Suck Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(1):21-30.   Published online March 23, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.0027
  • 3,384 View
  • 95 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of seasons and weather on the volume of trauma patients in central Korea.

Methods

The records of 4,665 patients treated at Chungbuk National Hospital Regional Trauma Center from January 2016 to December 2019 were retrospectively reviewed. Meteorological data including hourly temperature (°C), precipitation (mm), humidity (%), and wind speed (m/s) for each district were collected retrospectively. Statistical analysis was done using the independent <i>t</i>-test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and linear regression analysis.

Results

Patients’ average age was 53.66 years, with a significant difference between men (49.92 years) and women (60.48 years) (p<0.001). Rolling/slipping down was a prominent cause of injury in winter (28.4%, n=283), with statistical significance (p<0.001). Trauma occurred least frequently in winter (p=0.005). Linear regression analysis revealed an increasing number of patients as the temperature increased (p<0.05), the humidity increased (p<0.001), and the wind speed decreased (p<0.001). Precipitation did not affect patient volume (p=0.562). One-way ANOVA revealed a decreased incidence of trauma when the temperature exceeded 30°C (p<0.001), and when the humidity was more than 75%, compared to 25–50% and 50–75%.

Conclusions

At the regional trauma center of Chungbuk National University Hospital, in central Korea, the number of trauma patients was lowest in winter, and patient volume was affected by temperature, humidity, and wind speed.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Climate change and mental health in Korea: A scoping review
    Jiyoung Shin, Juha Baek, Sumi Chae
    Journal of Climate Change Research.2023; 14(6-2): 989.     CrossRef
  • The impact of COVID-19 on trauma patients and orthopedic trauma operations at a single focused training center for trauma in Korea
    Wonseok Choi, Hanju Kim, Whee Sung Son, Seungyeob Sakong, Jun-Min Cho, Nak-Jun Choi, Tae-Wook Noh, Namryeol Kim, Jae-Woo Cho, Jong-Keon Oh
    Journal of Trauma and Injury.2022; 35(3): 195.     CrossRef
Correlations of Weather and Time Variables with Visits of Trauma Patients at a Regional Trauma Center in Korea
Hyuk Jin Choi, Jae Hoon Jang, Il Jae Wang, Mahnjeong Ha, Seunghan Yu, Jung Hwan Lee, Byung Chul Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2020;33(4):248-255.   Published online December 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.0062
  • 2,982 View
  • 69 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

Trauma incidence and hospitalizations of trauma patients are generally believed to be affected by season and weather. The objective of this study was to explore possible associations of the hospitalization rate of trauma patients with weather and time variables at a single regional trauma center in South Korea.

Methods

Trauma hospitalization data were obtained from a regional trauma center in South Korea from January 1, 2017 to December 31, 2019. In total, from 6,788 patients with trauma, data of 3,667 patients were analyzed, excluding those from outside the city where the trauma center was located. Hourly weather service data were obtained from the Korea Meteorological Administration.

Results

The hospitalization rate showed positive correlations with temperature (r=0.635) and wind speed (r=0.501), but a negative correlation with humidity (r=−0.620). It showed no significant correlation (r=0.036) with precipitation. The hospitalization rate also showed significant correlations with time of day (p=0.033) and month (p=0.22).

Conclusions

Weather and time affected the number of hospitalizations at a trauma center. The findings of this study could be used to determine care delivery, staffing, and resource allocation plans at trauma centers and emergency departments.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Climate change and mental health in Korea: A scoping review
    Jiyoung Shin, Juha Baek, Sumi Chae
    Journal of Climate Change Research.2023; 14(6-2): 989.     CrossRef
The Influence of the Regional Weather in Geriatric Trauma
Jung Ho Kim, Byung Soo Do, Sam Beom Lee, Sung Hoon Lee, Jong Won Si, Jae Young Lee, Oh Lyong Kim
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2006;19(2):97-104.
  • 1,004 View
  • 2 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Many factors influence the occurrence and severity of geriatric trauma, and regional weather is regarded as one factor that influences geriatric trauma. In this study, to predict the type, severity, and incidence of geriatric trauma patient, we analyzed the influence of regional weather on geriatric trauma.
METHODS
The subjects of our investigation were trauma patients over sixty-five years of age who visited the Emergency Department (ED) of Yeungnam University Hospital during a one-year period. We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of 436 geriatric trauma patients, and the data were analyzed by using SPSS 12.0 for Window. The weather was based on data from the Korea Meteorological Administration.
RESULTS
The average age was 72.8 years old, and the ratio of males to females was 1:1.1. The mean spell out ISS was 10.8, and no difference was found between males and females. Slips were the most common cause of trauma. The largest numbers of aged trauma patients, 46, visited the ED in May, and the smallest number of such patients, 24, visited the ED in December. In addition to, summer saw the largest number of aged trauma patients. The type of trauma, the Injury Severity Score, and the number of patients had no relationship with season. On sunny days, the ISS was larger in patients who had hypotension and who had tachycardia. On rainy day, the ISS was larger in male patients and cultivator accident patients. The number of patients was larger on partly cloudy days.
CONCLUSION
In spring and summer and on partly cloudy days, we must be prepared to treat aged traumatized patients in the E.D. On rainy days, visual sensation, tactual sense, and acoustic sense must be closely examined. In addition,on rainy day, aged male traumatized patients or cultivator accident patients must to be closely observation.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury