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12 "Angiography"
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Original Article
Angioembolization performed by trauma surgeons for trauma patients: is it feasible in Korea? A retrospective study
Soonseong Kwon, Kyounghwan Kim, Soon Tak Jeong, Joongsuck Kim, Kwanghee Yeo, Ohsang Kwon, Sung Jin Park, Jihun Gwak, Wu Seong Kang
J Trauma Inj. 2024;37(1):28-36.   Published online January 12, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0076
  • 757 View
  • 21 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Recent advancements in interventional radiology have made angioembolization an invaluable modality in trauma care. Angioembolization is typically performed by interventional radiologists. In this study, we aimed to investigate the safety and efficacy of emergency angioembolization performed by trauma surgeons.
Methods
We identified trauma patients who underwent emergency angiography due to significant trauma-related hemorrhage between January 2020 and June 2023 at our trauma center. Until May 2022, two dedicated interventional radiologists performed emergency angiography at our center. However, since June 2022, a trauma surgeon with a background and experience in vascular surgery has performed emergency angiography for trauma-related bleeding. The indications for trauma surgeon–performed angiography included significant hemorrhage from liver injury, pelvic injury, splenic injury, or kidney injury. We assessed the angiography results according to the operator of the initial angiographic procedure. The term “failure of the first angioembolization” was defined as rebleeding from any cause, encompassing patients who underwent either re-embolization due to rebleeding or surgery due to rebleeding.
Results
No significant differences were found between the interventional radiologists and the trauma surgeon in terms of re-embolization due to rebleeding, surgery due to rebleeding, or the overall failure rate of the first angioembolization. Mortality and morbidity rates were also similar between the two groups. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis evaluating failure after the first angioembolization, pelvic embolization emerged as the sole significant risk factor (adjusted odds ratio, 3.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.05–10.33; P=0.041). Trauma surgeon–performed angioembolization was not deemed a significant risk factor in the multivariable logistic regression model.
Conclusions
Trauma surgeons, when equipped with the necessary endovascular skills and experience, can safely perform angioembolization. To further improve quality control, an enhanced training curriculum for trauma surgeons is warranted.
Summary
Case Reports
Successful nonoperative management of a simultaneous high-grade splenic injury and devascularized kidney in Australia: a case report
Peter Thanh Tam Nguyen, Jeremy M. Hsu
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(4):431-434.   Published online September 7, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0017
  • 572 View
  • 11 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Severe blunt injuries to isolated solid abdominal viscera have been previously managed nonoperatively; however, management algorithms for simultaneous visceral injuries are less well defined. We report a polytrauma case of a 33-year-old man involved in a motorbike collision who presented with left-sided chest and abdominal pain. Initial imaging demonstrated multiple solid organ injuries with American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) grade V splenic injury and complete devascularization of the left kidney. The patient underwent urgent angioembolic coiling of the distal splenic artery with successful nonoperative management of simultaneous grade V solid organ injuries.
Summary
Management of a traumatic avulsion fracture of the occipital condyle in polytrauma patient in Korea: a case report
Chang Hwa Ham, Woo-Keun Kwon, Joo Han Kim, Youn-Kwan Park, Jong Hyun Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(2):147-151.   Published online December 8, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2022.0058
  • 1,676 View
  • 48 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Avulsion fracture of the occipital condyle are rare lesion at craniovertebral junction. It is often related to high-energy traumatic injuries and show diverse clinical presentations. Neurologic deficit and instabilities may justify surgical treatment. However, the integrity of neurovascular structures is undervalued in the current literatures. In this case report, we described a 26-year-old female patient with avulsion fracture of occipital condyle following a traffic accident. On initial presentation, her Glasgow Coma Scale was 8. She presented with fracture compound comminuted depressed, on the left side of her forehead with skull base fracture extending into clivus and occipital condyle. Her left occipital condyle showed avulsion injury with displacement deep into the skull base. On her computed tomography angiography, the displaced occipital condyle compressed on the sigmoid sinus resulting in its obstruction. While she was recovering her consciousness during her stay in the hospital, the lower cranial nerves showed dysfunctions corresponding to Collet-Sicard syndrome. Due to high risk of vascular injury, the patient was conservatively treated for the occipital condyle fracture. On the 4 months postdischarge follow-up, her cranial nerve symptoms practically recovered, and the occipital condyle showed signs of fusion without further displacement. Current literatures focus on neurologic deficit and stability for the surgical decisions. However, it is also important to evaluate the neurovascular integrity to assess the risk of its manipulation as it may result in fatal outcome. This case shows, an unstable avulsion occipital condyle fracture with neurologic deficit can be treated conservatively and show a favorable outcome.
Summary
Delayed diagnosis of popliteal artery injury after traumatic knee dislocation in Korea: a case report
Chung-Eun Lee, In-Seok Jang, Sang-Yoon Song, Jung-Woo Lim, Kun-Tae Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(2):142-146.   Published online December 6, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2022.0064
  • 1,731 View
  • 51 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The popliteal artery damage is present to range from 1.6% to 64% of patients with knee dislocation, and it is crucial to evaluate vascular damage even if there are no prominent ischemic changes in the distal area. The injury of the popliteal artery by high-energy forces around the knee caused by a fall or traffic accident is a potentially limb-threatening complication in traumatic knee dislocation. The popliteal artery injury by blunt trauma has a high risk of limb amputation because the initial symptoms can show normal vascular circulation without urgent ischemia or obvious vascular injury signs. Since the collateral branches can delay the symptoms of decisive ischemia or pulseless extremity, the vascular damage is a major cause of limb amputation. In the present study, we describe a rare case of delayed diagnosis of popliteal artery injury after traumatic knee dislocation, requiring urgent limb revascularization surgery. After revascularization of the occluded popliteal artery, graft interposition was performed, and successful restoration was confirmed. This case illustrates that, even if ankle-brachial index >0.9 or equal pedal pulse to the uninjured extremity, serial vascular evaluation is required if there are soft signs such as diminished pulses, neurologic signs, or high-energy damage such as multiple ligament ruptures since delayed diagnosis of artery injury can be the major cause of limb amputation. The clinicians need to regard high-energy trauma such as multiple ligament rupture around the knee as a hard sign, and immediate computed tomography angiography can be helpful for accurate diagnosis and treatment.
Summary
Original Article
Epidemiology and clinical characteristics of posttraumatic hospitalized patients with symptoms related to venous thromboembolism: a single-center retrospective study
Hyung Su Park, Sung Youl Hyun, Woo Sung Choi, Jin-Seong Cho, Jae Ho Jang, Jea Yeon Choi
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(3):159-167.   Published online June 10, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0052
  • 2,029 View
  • 61 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of trauma inpatients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) symptoms diagnosed using computed tomographic angiography (CTA) in Korea
Methods
In total, 7,634 patients admitted to the emergency department of Gachon University Gil Medical Center, a tertiary hospital, and hospitalized between July 1, 2018 and December 31, 2020 were registered for this study. Of these patients, 278 patients who underwent CTA were enrolled in our study.
Results
VTE was found in 120 of the 7,634 patients (1.57%), and the positive diagnosis rate of the 278 patients who underwent CTA was 43.2% (120 of 278). The incidence of VTE was statistically significantly higher among those with severe head and neck injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale, 3–5) than among those with nonsevere head and neck injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale, 0–2; P=0.038). In a subgroup analysis, the severe and nonsevere head and neck injury groups showed statistically significant differences in known independent risk factors for VTE. In logistic regression analysis, the adjusted odds ratio of severe head and neck injury (Abbreviated Injury Scale, 3–5) for VTE was 1.891 (95% confidence interval, 1.043–3.430).
Conclusions
Trauma patients with severe head and neck injuries are more susceptible to VTE than those with nonsevere head and neck injuries. Thus, physicians must consider CTA as a priority for the diagnosis of VTE in trauma patients with severe head and neck injuries who show VTE-associated symptoms.
Summary
Case Report
Spontaneously Resolved Lumbar Artery Injury after Blunt Trauma
Seung Hyuk Nam, Je Il Ryu, Jin Hwan Cheong, Ki-Chul Park, Sun Kyun Ro
J Trauma Inj. 2020;33(2):124-127.   Published online June 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2019.041
  • 4,322 View
  • 103 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

Major bleeding caused by vascular injuries of the abdominal aorta or its branches after blunt trauma often leads to mortality or major morbidity. We report a case that lumbar artery injury following blunt trauma was spontaneously resolved without any surgical or interventional treatment. Lumbar artery injury after blunt trauma could be treated conservatively without surgical or interventional treatment in a selected case. When an aortic or its branch injury was suspicious, diagnostic angiograms in the setting of interventional treatment may be helpful to decide an appropriate treatment modality.

Summary
Original Article
Essential Factors in Predicting the Need for Angio-Embolization in the Acute Treatment of Pelvic Fracture with Hemorrhage
Seok-Won Yang, Hee-Gon Park, Sung-Hyun Kim, Sung-Hyun Yoon, Seung-Gwan Park
J Trauma Inj. 2019;32(2):101-106.   Published online June 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2019.008
  • 3,253 View
  • 51 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

The purpose of this study was to determine the essential factors for prompt arrangement of angio-embolization in patients with pelvic ring fractures.

Methods

A total of 62 patients with pelvic ring fractures who underwent angio-embolization in Dankook University Hospital from March 2013 to June 2018 were retrospectively reviewed. There were 38 men and 24 women with a mean age of 59.8 years. The types of pelvic ring fractures were categorized according to the Tile classification. Patient variables included sex, initial hemoglobin concentration, initial systolic blood pressure, transfused packed red blood cells within 24 hours, Injury Severity Score (ISS), mortality rate, length of hospital stay, and time to angio-embolization.

Results

The most common pelvic fracture pattern was Tile type B (n=34, 54.8%). The mean ISS was 27.3±10.9 with 50% having an ISS ≥25. The mean time to angio-embolization from arrival was 173.6±89 minutes. Type B (180.1±72.3 minutes) and type C fractures (174.7±91.3 minutes) required more time to angio-embolization than type A fractures (156.6±123 minutes). True arterial bleeding was identified in types A (35.7%), B (64.7%), and C (71.4%).

Conclusions

It is important to save time to reach the angio-embolization room in treating patients with pelvic bone fractures. Trauma surgeons need to consider prompt arrangement of angio-embolization when encountering Tile type B or C pelvic fractures due to the high risk of true arterial bleeding.

Summary
Case Report
Rectus Sheath Hematoma Caused by Noncontact Strenuous Exercise
Gil Hwan Kim, Jae Hun Kim, Ho Hyun Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2017;30(4):227-230.   Published online December 30, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2017.30.4.227
  • 3,217 View
  • 35 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

Rectus sheath hematoma (RSH) is an uncommon but well-documented clinical condition. It is usually caused by direct trauma or anticoagulation, although there are many other causes. However, RSH after noncontact strenuous exercise is very rare. We present a rare case of RSH after playing volleyball without direct trauma that was successfully treated by angiographic embolization.

Summary
Original Article
Comparisons of Fracture Types and Pelvic Angiographic Findings in Hemodynamically Unstable Pelvic Bone Fracture
Kwon Il Lee, Kang Hyun Lee, Sung Chan Kang, Sung Min Park, Yong Su Jang, Tae Yong Shin, Sung Oh Hwang, Hyun Kim
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2007;20(1):26-32.
  • 1,240 View
  • 3 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Hemorrhagic shock is the leading cause of death in patients with pelvic bone fractures. The majority of blood loss is due to injured pelvic arteries and retroperitoneal veins and to bleeding from the fracture site itself. Pelvic angiography and embolization of injured vessels is an effective way to control continuous bleeding. However, identifying the bleeding focus in hemodynamically unstable patients before diagnostic intervention is difficult. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between fracture patterns in hemodynamically unstable patients with pelvic fractures and later pelvic angiography findings.
METHODS
We performed a retrospective study of 21 hemodynamically unstable patients with pelvic fractures admitted to our emergency department between April 2001 to April 2006. All 21 patients underwent pelvic angiography. Pelvic fractures were assessed according to the Tile's classification and the degree of injury was assessed using the Injury Severity Score (ISS) and Revised Trauma Score (RTS). The hemodynamic status of the patients was defined using vital signs, base excess, and blood lactate. Fracture patterns were compared with hemodynamic status and angiography findings.
RESULTS
In the 5year study period, 21 hemodynamically unstable pelvic bone fracture patients were admitted; ten were men (47.6%), and 11 were women (52.4%). The mean age was 41.1 years (range: +/-20.1). Of the 21 embolization was performed in 6 patient (28.6%): 1 patient of the 5 unstable pelvic bone fracture patients (20%), and 5 patients of 16 the stable pelvic bone fracture patients (31.3%). There were no significant differences between the RTS (p=0.587) and embolization rate (p=0.774) for either the stable patients or the unstable patients. Patients with arterial injury on angiography had a lower RTS compared with patients without arterial injury but there was no significant difference in ISS between the two groups. The angiographic injured sites were five internal femoral arteries and one external femoral artery.
CONCLUSION
The findings in this study suggest that the pelvic fracture pattern in hemodynamically unstable patients with pelvic fractures does not correlate with pelvic angiography findings.
Summary
Case Report
Treatment of Ongoing Bleeding after a Damage Control Laparotomy for a Pelvic Bone Fracture: Arterial Embolization: A Case Report
Ki Hoon Kim, Kyu Hyouk Kyung, Jin Su Kim, Sung Jin Park, So Hyun Nam, Woon Won Kim, Yong Han Kim
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2011;24(2):159-163.
  • 1,103 View
  • 3 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Massive bleeding due to traumatic pelvic bone fracture is a leading cause of death. Thus, several methods to control bleeding have been attempted, but none of these has yet been clearly established. After an automobile accident, a 34-year-old motorist was admitted to the Emergency Department for right hip,leg and abdominal pain. Because the patient's pressure remained consistently low and pelvic bone fracture and abdominal bleeding were found on radiologic examination, an explorative laparotomy was performed. After pelvic packing and bleeding control, bleeding still continued, so Angiography was performed, and arterial embolization for bleeding was performed.
Summary
Original Articles
The Importance of the Trauma Surgeon: A Reflection on the Management of Hemodynamically Unstable Pelvic Trauma Patients
Sung Shin, Kyu Hyuk Kyung, Ji Wan Kim, Jung Jae Kim, Suk Kyung Hong
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2009;22(2):254-259.
  • 1,306 View
  • 2 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
Pelvic trauma is a serious skeletal injury with high mortality. Especially in cases of severe injury trauma, treatment outcomes depend on early diagnosis and intervention. We expect trauma surgeon to play an important role in the management of severe multiple trauma patients.
METHODS
A retrospective study was performed on pelvic trauma patients with hemodynamic instability between March 2005 and September 2009. We divided the time period into period I (March 2005~Feburary 2009) and period II (March 2009~September 2009). The trauma surgeon and team started to work from period II. Data were collected regarding demographic characteristics, mechanism of injury, type of pelvic fracture, ISS (injury severity score), treatment modality, transfusion requirement, time to definitive treatment, and mortality.
RESULTS
During period I, among 7 hemodynamically unstable patients, 4(57.1%) patients died. However during Period II, only one of 6(16.6%) patients died. The demographic data and injury scores showed no differences between the two time periods, but the time to definitive treatment was very short with trauma team intervention( 14.4 hrs vs. 3.9 hrs). Also, the amount of transfusion was less(41.1 U vs. 13.9 U). With arterial embolization, early pelvic external fixation led to less transfusion and made patients more stable.
CONCLUSION
This study demonstrated the importance of the trauma surgeon and the trauma team in cases of hemodynamically unstable pelvic trauma. Even with the same facility and resources, an active trauma team approach can increase the survival of severely injured multiple trauma patients.
Summary
Treatment Strategy of Transcatheter Arterial Embolization after Pelvic CT Angiography in Traumatic Pelvic Hemorrhage: A Single Regional Emergency Center's Experience
Yu Jin Lee, Hwan Jun Jae, Won Chul Cha, Jun Seok Seo, Hyo Cheol Kim, Cheong Il Shin, Sang Do Shin
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2009;22(2):184-192.
  • 1,060 View
  • 5 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment strategy of transcatheter arterial embolization after pelvic CT angiography (CTA) in cases of traumatic pelvic hemorrhage.
METHODS
This is a retrospective analysis of pelvic hemorrhage patients who underwent transcatheter arterial embolization after pelvic CTA at our regional emergency center during a 31-month period. We reviewed the medical records and imagings of all these patients.
RESULTS
Transcatheter arterial embolization was performed in 17 patients (M:F=7:10, mean age=53.9) who underwent pelvic CTA for the evaluation of traumatic pelvic hemorrhage. Arterial bleeding was demonstrated on pelvic CTA in all patients, and the combined injury was also noted in 13 patients. The admission-to-CTA time was 84.53+/-66.92 minutes, and the CTA-to-embolization time was 147.65+/-99.97 minutes. Extravasation of contrast media or pseudoaneurysm was demonstrated on conventional angiography in all patients. Unilateral iliac artery embolization was performed in 8 patients, and bilateral iliac artery embolization was performed in 9 patients. Additional embolizations other than in the iliac arteries were performed in 7 patients. Initial hemostasis was achieved in 16 patients. One patient died of ongoing pelvic bleeding. Rebleeding occurred in only one patient and hemostasis was achieved with the second embolization. Another patient died of intracranial and facial bleeding in spite of pelvic hemostasis. The overall mortality was 11.8%, and there was no significant adverse effects in the other patients.
CONCLUSION
Transcatheter arterial embolization after pelvic CTA is an effective treatment strategy in the management of traumatic pelvic hemorrhage patients.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury