Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
64 "Blunt"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Original Article
Validation of chest trauma scoring systems in polytrauma: a retrospective study with 1,038 patients in Korea
Hongrye Kim, Mou Seop Lee, Su Young Yoon, Jonghee Han, Jin Young Lee, Junepill Seok
Received December 20, 2023  Accepted January 26, 2024  Published online May 9, 2024  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0087    [Epub ahead of print]
  • 236 View
  • 8 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Appropriate scoring systems can help classify and treat polytrauma patients. This study aimed to validate chest trauma scoring systems in polytrauma patients.
Methods
Data from 1,038 polytrauma patients were analyzed. The primary outcomes were one or more complications: pneumonia, chest complications requiring surgery, and mortality. The Thoracic Trauma Severity Score (TTSS), Chest Trauma Score, Rib Fracture Score, and RibScore were compared using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis in patients with or without head trauma.
Results
In total, 1,038 patients were divided into two groups: those with complications (822, 79.2%) and those with no complications (216, 20.8%). Sex and body mass index did not significantly differ between the groups. However, age was higher in the complications group (64.1±17.5 years vs. 54.9±17.6 years, P<0.001). The proportion of head trauma patients was higher (58.3% vs. 24.6%, P<0.001) and the Glasgow Coma Scale score was worse (median [interquartile range], 12 [6.5–15] vs. 15 [14–15]; P<0.001) in the complications group. The number of rib fractures, the degree of rib fracture displacement, and the severity of pulmonary contusions were also higher in the complications group. In the area under the ROC curve analysis, the TTSS showed the highest predictive value for the entire group (0.731), head trauma group (0.715), and no head trauma group (0.730), while RibScore had the poorest performance (0.643, 0.622, and 0.622, respectively)
Conclusions
Early injury severity detection and grading are crucial for patients with blunt chest trauma. The chest trauma scoring systems introduced to date, including the TTSS, are not acceptable for clinical use, especially in polytrauma patients with traumatic brain injury. Therefore, further revisions and analyses of chest trauma scoring systems are recommended.
Summary
Case Reports
A rare and unique experience of a blunt intrathoracic traumatic injury of the trachea and its management in South Africa: a case report
Rudo Mutsa Vanessa Pswarayi, Anna Katariina Kerola
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(4):416-420.   Published online November 30, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0036
  • 413 View
  • 12 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Blunt intrathoracic tracheal injuries are rare, even among blunt chest trauma patients. An early diagnosis based on a high index of suspicion allows for timely surgical management of potentially fatal airway trauma, thereby improving overall outcomes. Diagnosing these injuries can be difficult due to their nonspecific clinical features and the occasional difficulty in radiologic diagnosis. If a patient exhibits respiratory compromise with difficult ventilation and poor lung expansion, despite the insertion and management of an intercostal drain following high-energy blunt trauma, there should be a heightened suspicion of potential airway trauma. The aim of primary repair is to restore airway integrity and to minimize the loss of pulmonary parenchyma function. This case report discusses the rare clinical presentation of a patient with blunt trauma to the intrathoracic airway, the surgical management thereof, and his overall outcome. Although blunt traumatic injuries of the trachea are extremely rare and often fatal, early surgical intervention can potentially reduce the risk of mortality.
Summary
Bleeding control of an injury to the infrarenal inferior vena cava and right external iliac vein by ipsilateral internal iliac artery and superficial femoral vein ligation after blunt abdominal trauma in Korea: a case report
Hoonsung Park, Maru Kim, Dae Sang Lee, Tae Hwa Hong, Doo-Hun Kim, Hang joo Cho
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(4):441-446.   Published online November 17, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0019
  • 670 View
  • 16 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Inferior vena cava (IVC) injuries, while accounting for fewer than 0.5% of blunt abdominal trauma cases, are among the most difficult to manage. Despite advancements in prehospital care, transportation, operative techniques, and perioperative management, the mortality rate for IVC injuries has remained at 20% to 66% for several decades. Furthermore, 30% to 50% of patients with IVC injuries succumb during the prehospital phase. A 65-year-old male patient, who had been struck in the back by a 500-kg excavator shovel at a construction site, was transported to a regional trauma center. Injuries to the right side of the infrarenal IVC and the right external iliac vein (EIV) were suspected, along with fractures to the right iliac bone and sacrum. The injury to the right side of the infrarenal IVC wall was repaired, and the right internal iliac artery was ligated. However, persistent bleeding around the right EIV was observed, and we were unable to achieve proximal and distal control of the right EIV. Attempts at prolonged manual compression were unsuccessful. To decrease venous return, we ligated the right superficial femoral vein. This reduced the amount of bleeding, enabling us to secure the surgical field. We ultimately controlled the bleeding, and approximately 5 L of blood products were infused intraoperatively. A second-look operation was performed 2 days later, by which time most of the bleeding sites had ceased. Orthopedic surgeons then took over the operation, performing closed reduction and external fixation. Five days later, the patient underwent definitive fixation and was transferred for rehabilitation on postoperative day 22.
Summary
Blunt abdominal trauma resulting in pancreatic injury in a pediatric patient in Australia: a case report
Harmanjit Dev, Colin Kikiros
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(3):310-314.   Published online August 24, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0013
  • 719 View
  • 41 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Pancreatic trauma from a blunt injury is fairly uncommon in the pediatric population. Furthermore, such trauma with associated disruption of the pancreatic duct (PD) is even less prevalent and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Pancreatic injuries in the pediatric population are often missed and hence require a thorough workup in children presenting with any form of abdominal injury. This case report describes a young boy who presented with abdominal pain and did not initially inform medical staff about any injury. For this reason, his initial provisional diagnosis was appendicitis, but he was later found to have transection of the pancreas with injury to the PD on imaging. The management of such injuries in pediatric patients often poses a challenge due to a lack of pediatric physicians trained to perform interventions such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Furthermore, such interventions carry a higher risk when performed on children due to the smaller size of their pancreatic ducts. As a result, our patient had to be transferred to an adult center to undergo this procedure. Thus, maintaining a high degree of suspicion, along with a detailed history and examination, is crucial for the early diagnosis and management of pancreatic injuries.
Summary
Successful minimally invasive management using transcatheter arterial embolization in a hemodynamically stable elderly patient with mesenteric vascular injury in a hybrid emergency room system in Korea: a case report
So Ra Ahn, Joo Hyun Lee, Sang Hyun Seo, Chan Yong Park
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(4):435-440.   Published online July 25, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0018
  • 2,218 View
  • 22 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Mesenteric injury occurs rarely in cases associated with blunt abdominal trauma. Despite its low incidence, mesenteric injury can lead to fatal outcomes such as hypovolemic shock due to hemoperitoneum or sepsis due to intestinal ischemia, or perforation-related peritonitis. For mesenteric injuries, especially those involving massive bleeding, intestinal ischemia, and perforation, the standard treatment is surgery. However, in the case of operative management, it should be borne in mind that there is a possibility of complications and mortality during and after surgery. The usefulness of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) is well known in solid organs but is controversial for mesenteric injury. We present a 75-year-old man with mesenteric injury due to blunt abdominal trauma. Initial abdominal computed tomography showed no hemoperitoneum, but a mesenteric contusion and pseudoaneurysm with a diameter of 17 mm were observed near the origin of the superior mesenteric artery. Since there were no findings requiring emergency surgery such as free air or intestinal ischemia, it was decided to perform nonoperative management with TAE using microcoils in hybrid emergency room system. TAE was performed successfully, and there were no complications such as bleeding, bowel ischemia, or delayed bowel perforation. He was discharged on the 23rd day after admission with percutaneous catheter drainage for drainage of mesenteric hematoma. The authors believe that treatment with TAE for highly selected elderly patients with mesenteric injuries has the positive aspect of minimally invasive management, considering the burden of general anesthesia and the various avoidable intraoperative and postoperative complications.
Summary
Ruptured uterus in a 36-week pregnant patient with hemorrhagic shock after blunt trauma in Korea: a case report
Sebeom Jeon, Suyoung Park, Soohyun Oh, Jayun Cho
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(3):281-285.   Published online January 18, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2022.0070
  • 1,416 View
  • 30 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Traumatic uterine rupture is uncommon but can be fatal and life-threatening for both the mother and infant. In addition to complications caused by trauma itself, such as pelvic fracture, gestational complications such as placental abruption, abortion, premature labor, rupture of membranes, maternal death, and stillbirth can occur. In particular, fetuses have been reported to have a high mortality rate in cases of traumatic uterine rupture. A 36-year-old pregnant female patient fell from the fourth floor and was admitted to our trauma center. We observed large hemoperitoneum, pelvic fractures, and spleen laceration, and the fetus was presumed to be located outside the uterus. The pregnant woman was hemodynamically unstable. Although the fetus was stillborn, angioembolization and surgical treatment were properly performed through collaboration with an interventional radiologist, obstetrician, and trauma surgeons. After two orthopedic operations, the patient was discharged after 34 days. This case report suggests the importance of a multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of pregnant trauma patients.
Summary
Gastric necrosis after gastric artery embolization in a patient with blunt abdominal trauma: a case report
Gil Hwan Kim, Sung Jin Park, Chan Ik Park
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(4):287-290.   Published online December 20, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2022.0054
  • 1,370 View
  • 34 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Gastric artery bleeding after blunt trauma is rare. In such cases, if vital signs are stable, angiographic embolization may be performed. Although gastric artery embolization is known to be safe due to its anatomical properties, complications may occur. We report a case of gastric necrosis after gastric artery embolization in a patient with blunt abdominal trauma. The 55-year-old male patient was found with gastric arterial bleeding after a traffic accident. His vital signs were stable, and gastric artery embolization was performed. Gastric necrosis was subsequently found, which was treated surgically.
Summary
Original Article
National utilization of rib fracture fixation in the geriatric population in the United States
Jennifer M. Brewer, Leah Aakjar, Kelsey Sullivan, Vijay Jayaraman, Manuel Moutinho, Elan Jeremitsky, Andrew R. Doben
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(3):173-180.   Published online May 31, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0076
  • 2,378 View
  • 55 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The use of surgical stabilization of rib fractures (SSRF) has steadily increased over the past decade. Recent literature suggests that a larger population may benefit from SSRF, and that the geriatric population—as the highest-risk population—may receive the greatest improvement from these interventions. We sought to determine the overall utilization of SSRF in the United States.
Methods
The National Trauma Database was analyzed between 2016 and 2017. The inclusion criteria were all patients ≥65 years old with rib fractures. We further stratified these patients according to age (65–79 vs. ≥80 years old), the presence of coding for flail chest, three or more rib fractures, and intervention (surgical vs. nonoperative management). The main outcomes were surgical interventions, mortality, pneumonia, length of stay, intensive care unit length of stay, ventilator use, and tracheostomy.
Results
Overall, 93,638 patients were identified. SSRF was performed in 992 patients. Patients who underwent SSRF had improved mortality in the 65 to 79 age group, regardless of the number of ribs fractured. We identified 92,637 patients in the age group of 65 to 79 years old who did not undergo SSRF. This represents an additional 20,000 patients annually who may benefit from SSRF.
Conclusions
By conservative standards and the well-established Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma clinical practice guidelines, SSRF is underutilized. Our data suggest that SSRF may be very beneficial for the geriatric population, specifically those aged 65 to 79 years with any rib fractures. We hypothesize that roughly 20,000 additional cases will meet the inclusion criteria for SSRF each year. It is therefore imperative that we train acute care surgeons in this skill set.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Incidence of adult rib fracture injuries and changing hospitalization practice patterns: a 10-year analysis
    Sergio M. Navarro, Rafat H. Solaiman, Jilun Zhang, Ilitch Diaz-Gutierrez, Christopher Tignanelli, James V. Harmon
    European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Case Reports
Complete Transection of the Cystic Duct and Artery after Blunt Trauma: A Case Report
Sung Hoon Cho, Kyoung Hoon Lim
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(4):294-298.   Published online December 16, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0097
  • 2,847 View
  • 80 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Extrahepatic biliary tract and gallbladder injuries following blunt abdominal trauma are uncommon. Traumatic cystic duct transection is even rarer, which has frequently caused missed diagnosis and delayed treatment. An 18-year-old female patient with no past medical history was transferred to the Trauma Center of Kyungpook National University Hospital after falling from a height of approximately 20 meters. She became hemodynamically stable after initial resuscitation, and initial contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed right kidney traumatic infarction and multiple intrahepatic contusions with minimal fluid collection but no extravasation of the contrast. She was admitted to the intensive care unit. On the second day of hospitalization, her abdomen became distended, with follow-up CT showing a large collection of intra-abdominal fluid. Laparoscopic exploration was then performed, which revealed devascularization of the gallbladder with complete transection of the cystic duct and artery. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed, as well as primary closure of the cystic duct orifice on the common bile duct using a 4-0 Prolene suture. After surgery, no clinical evidence of biliary leakage or common bile duct stricture was observed.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Rare Complication of Percutaneous Transhepatic Gallbladder Drainage
    Yang-Yuan Chen, Chih-Hsuan Chen, Yung-Fang Chen
    Gastroenterology.2022; 163(5): e29.     CrossRef
Extra-Pericardial Tamponade due to Internal Thoracic Artery Rupture after Blunt Trauma: A Case Report
Dongsub Noh, Sung Wook Chang, Dae Sung Ma
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(3):183-186.   Published online September 30, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0045
  • 3,177 View
  • 106 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Cardiac tamponade is an acute life-threatening condition that predominantly involves the intra-pericardial space; however, an expanding mediastinal hematoma can also sometimes cause cardiac tamponade. Here we describe the case of a 45-year-old male driver in whom a traffic accident resulted in rupture of the left internal thoracic artery (ITA), extra-pericardial hematoma, and sternal fracture. After resuscitation, he was scheduled to undergo angio-embolization to repair the ruptured left ITA, but he suddenly developed cardiac tamponade that required a decompressive sternotomy. Nevertheless, the patient had an uncomplicated recovery, and this case suggests that extra-pericardial cardiac tamponade should be considered as a possible consequence of retro-sternal hematoma due to traumatic ITA rupture.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Traumatic Pseudoaneurysms of the Internal Mammary Artery: Two Cases and Percutaneous Intervention
    Kayla A. Aikins, Zoé N. Anderson, Timothy M. Koci
    Diagnostics.2023; 14(1): 63.     CrossRef
Original Article
Blunt Cardiac Injuries That Require Operative Management: A Single-Center 7-Year Experience
Seung Hwan Lee, Myung Jin Jang, Yang Bin Jeon
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(4):242-247.   Published online July 14, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.0069
  • 5,882 View
  • 111 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

Blunt cardiac injuries (BCI) have a wide clinical spectrum, ranging from asymptomatic myocardial contusion to cardiac rupture and death. BCIs rarely require surgical intervention, but can be rapidly fatal, requiring prompt evaluation and surgical treatment in some cases. The aim of this study was to identify potential factors associated with in-hospital mortality after surgery in patients with BCI.

Methods

The medical records of 15 patients who had undergone emergency cardiac surgery for BCI between January 2014 and August 2020 were retrospectively reviewed. We included trauma patients older than 18 years admitted to Regional Trauma Center, Gachon University Gil Medical Center during the study period. Clinical and laboratory variables were compared between survivors and non-survivors.

Results

Non-survivors showed a significantly higher Injury Severity Score (p=0.001) and Abbreviated Injury Scale in the chest region (p=0.001) than survivors. American Association for the Surgery of Trauma-Organ Injury Scale Grade V injuries were significantly more common in non-survivors than in survivors (p=0.031). Non-survivors had significantly more preoperative packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions (p=0.019) and were significantly more likely to experience preoperative cardiac arrest (p=0.001) than survivors. Initial pH (p=0.010), lactate (p=0.026), and base excess (BE; p=0.026) levels showed significant differences between the two groups.

Conclusions

Initial pH, lactate, BE, ventricular injury, the amount of preoperative PRBC transfusions, and preoperative cardiac arrest were potential predictors of in-hospital mortality.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Treatment results of cardiac tamponade due to thoracic trauma at Jeju Regional Trauma Center, Korea: a case series
    Jeong Woo Oh, Minjeong Chae
    Journal of Trauma and Injury.2023; 36(3): 180.     CrossRef
Case Reports
Celiac Artery Compression After a Spine Fracture, and Pericardium Rupture After Blunt Trauma: A Case Report from a Single Injury
Joongsuck Kim, Hyun Min Cho, Sung Hwan Kim, Seong Hoon Jung, Jeong Eun Sohn, Kwangmin Lee
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(2):130-135.   Published online June 10, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.0053
  • 3,126 View
  • 68 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

Celiac artery compression is a rare condition in which the celiac artery is compressed by the median arcuate ligament. Case reports of compression after trauma are hard to find. Blunt traumatic pericardium rupture is also a rare condition. We report a single patient who experienced both rare conditions from a single blunt injury. An 18-year-old woman was brought to the trauma center after a fatal motorcycle accident, in which she was a passenger. The driver was found dead. Her vital signs were stable, but she complained of mild abdominal pain, chest wall pain, and severe back pain. There were no definite neurologic deficits. Her initial computed tomography (CT) scan revealed multiple rib fractures, moderate lung contusions with hemothorax, moderate liver injury, and severe lumbar spine fracture and dislocation. She was brought to the angiography room to check for active bleeding in the liver, which was not apparent. However, the guide wire was not able to pass through the celiac trunk. A review of the initial CT revealed kinking of the celiac trunk, which was assumed to be due to altered anatomy of the median arcuate ligament caused by spine fractures. Immediate fixation of the vertebrae was performed. During recovery, her hemothorax remained loculated. Suspecting empyema, thoracotomy was performed at 3 weeks after admission, revealing organized hematoma without pus formation, as well as rupture of the pericardium, which was immediately sutured, and decortication was carried out. Five weeks after admission, she had recovered without complications and was discharged home.

Summary
Delayed Diagnosis of Traumatic Rupture of Anterior Papillary Muscle of Tricuspid Valve; Importance of Trans-Esophageal Echocardiogram in the Evaluation of Major Blunt Chest Trauma
Ryan Bylsma, Mustafa Baldawi, Bruce Toporoff, Matthew Shin, Meghan Cochran-Yu, Davinder Ramsingh, Purvi Parwani, David G. Rabkin
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(2):136-140.   Published online June 4, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2020.0060
  • 2,623 View
  • 63 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

We present a case of delayed diagnosis of traumatic tricuspid valve rupture in a patient who was emergently brought to the operating room for repair of lacerations to the heart and liver without intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). Initial postoperative transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) did not show structural pathology. One week later, TTE with better image quality showed severe tricuspid regurgitation. Subsequently, TEE clearly demonstrated rupture of the anterior papillary muscle and flail anterior tricuspid leaflet. The case description is followed by a brief discussion of the utility of TEE in the setting of blunt thoracic trauma.

Summary
Spontaneously Resolved Lumbar Artery Injury after Blunt Trauma
Seung Hyuk Nam, Je Il Ryu, Jin Hwan Cheong, Ki-Chul Park, Sun Kyun Ro
J Trauma Inj. 2020;33(2):124-127.   Published online June 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2019.041
  • 4,332 View
  • 104 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

Major bleeding caused by vascular injuries of the abdominal aorta or its branches after blunt trauma often leads to mortality or major morbidity. We report a case that lumbar artery injury following blunt trauma was spontaneously resolved without any surgical or interventional treatment. Lumbar artery injury after blunt trauma could be treated conservatively without surgical or interventional treatment in a selected case. When an aortic or its branch injury was suspicious, diagnostic angiograms in the setting of interventional treatment may be helpful to decide an appropriate treatment modality.

Summary
Delayed manifestation of Isolated Intramural Hematoma of the duodenum resulting from Blunt abdominal Trauma
Tae Sun Ha, Jun Chul Chung
J Trauma Inj. 2020;33(1):53-58.   Published online March 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2019.042
  • 7,246 View
  • 149 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Duodenal injury following blunt abdominal trauma is a relatively unusual complication, and it may sometimes be difficult to distinguish a duodenal hematoma from duodenal perforation. According to recent reports, intramural hematomas typically resolve spontaneously with conservative treatment. Surgery, however, is occasionally necessary in some cases if the diagnosis is delayed, conservative therapy fails, or a high degree of suspicion of duodenal injury persists. We experienced a case of delayed manifestation of a duodenal intramural hematoma that was surgically treated.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Intramural duodenal hematoma: diagnosis and management of a rare entity
    Álvaro Pérez-Rubio, Juan Carlos Sebastián-Tomás, Sergio Navarro-Martínez, Marta Córcoles Córcoles, Carlos Domingo del Pozo
    Cirugía Española (English Edition).2023; 101(7): 515.     CrossRef
  • Hematoma intramural duodenal: diagnóstico y manejo de una entidad infrecuente
    Álvaro Pérez-Rubio, Juan Carlos Sebastián-Tomás, Sergio Navarro-Martínez, Marta Córcoles Córcoles, Carlos Domingo del Pozo
    Cirugía Española.2023; 101(7): 515.     CrossRef

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury