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26 "Blunt trauma"
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Case Reports
Blunt abdominal trauma resulting in pancreatic injury in a pediatric patient in Australia: a case report
Harmanjit Dev, Colin Kikiros
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(3):310-314.   Published online August 24, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0013
  • 731 View
  • 41 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Pancreatic trauma from a blunt injury is fairly uncommon in the pediatric population. Furthermore, such trauma with associated disruption of the pancreatic duct (PD) is even less prevalent and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Pancreatic injuries in the pediatric population are often missed and hence require a thorough workup in children presenting with any form of abdominal injury. This case report describes a young boy who presented with abdominal pain and did not initially inform medical staff about any injury. For this reason, his initial provisional diagnosis was appendicitis, but he was later found to have transection of the pancreas with injury to the PD on imaging. The management of such injuries in pediatric patients often poses a challenge due to a lack of pediatric physicians trained to perform interventions such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Furthermore, such interventions carry a higher risk when performed on children due to the smaller size of their pancreatic ducts. As a result, our patient had to be transferred to an adult center to undergo this procedure. Thus, maintaining a high degree of suspicion, along with a detailed history and examination, is crucial for the early diagnosis and management of pancreatic injuries.
Summary
Successful minimally invasive management using transcatheter arterial embolization in a hemodynamically stable elderly patient with mesenteric vascular injury in a hybrid emergency room system in Korea: a case report
So Ra Ahn, Joo Hyun Lee, Sang Hyun Seo, Chan Yong Park
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(4):435-440.   Published online July 25, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2023.0018
  • 2,256 View
  • 22 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Mesenteric injury occurs rarely in cases associated with blunt abdominal trauma. Despite its low incidence, mesenteric injury can lead to fatal outcomes such as hypovolemic shock due to hemoperitoneum or sepsis due to intestinal ischemia, or perforation-related peritonitis. For mesenteric injuries, especially those involving massive bleeding, intestinal ischemia, and perforation, the standard treatment is surgery. However, in the case of operative management, it should be borne in mind that there is a possibility of complications and mortality during and after surgery. The usefulness of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) is well known in solid organs but is controversial for mesenteric injury. We present a 75-year-old man with mesenteric injury due to blunt abdominal trauma. Initial abdominal computed tomography showed no hemoperitoneum, but a mesenteric contusion and pseudoaneurysm with a diameter of 17 mm were observed near the origin of the superior mesenteric artery. Since there were no findings requiring emergency surgery such as free air or intestinal ischemia, it was decided to perform nonoperative management with TAE using microcoils in hybrid emergency room system. TAE was performed successfully, and there were no complications such as bleeding, bowel ischemia, or delayed bowel perforation. He was discharged on the 23rd day after admission with percutaneous catheter drainage for drainage of mesenteric hematoma. The authors believe that treatment with TAE for highly selected elderly patients with mesenteric injuries has the positive aspect of minimally invasive management, considering the burden of general anesthesia and the various avoidable intraoperative and postoperative complications.
Summary
Ruptured uterus in a 36-week pregnant patient with hemorrhagic shock after blunt trauma in Korea: a case report
Sebeom Jeon, Suyoung Park, Soohyun Oh, Jayun Cho
J Trauma Inj. 2023;36(3):281-285.   Published online January 18, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2022.0070
  • 1,438 View
  • 30 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Traumatic uterine rupture is uncommon but can be fatal and life-threatening for both the mother and infant. In addition to complications caused by trauma itself, such as pelvic fracture, gestational complications such as placental abruption, abortion, premature labor, rupture of membranes, maternal death, and stillbirth can occur. In particular, fetuses have been reported to have a high mortality rate in cases of traumatic uterine rupture. A 36-year-old pregnant female patient fell from the fourth floor and was admitted to our trauma center. We observed large hemoperitoneum, pelvic fractures, and spleen laceration, and the fetus was presumed to be located outside the uterus. The pregnant woman was hemodynamically unstable. Although the fetus was stillborn, angioembolization and surgical treatment were properly performed through collaboration with an interventional radiologist, obstetrician, and trauma surgeons. After two orthopedic operations, the patient was discharged after 34 days. This case report suggests the importance of a multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of pregnant trauma patients.
Summary
Gastric necrosis after gastric artery embolization in a patient with blunt abdominal trauma: a case report
Gil Hwan Kim, Sung Jin Park, Chan Ik Park
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(4):287-290.   Published online December 20, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2022.0054
  • 1,381 View
  • 34 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Gastric artery bleeding after blunt trauma is rare. In such cases, if vital signs are stable, angiographic embolization may be performed. Although gastric artery embolization is known to be safe due to its anatomical properties, complications may occur. We report a case of gastric necrosis after gastric artery embolization in a patient with blunt abdominal trauma. The 55-year-old male patient was found with gastric arterial bleeding after a traffic accident. His vital signs were stable, and gastric artery embolization was performed. Gastric necrosis was subsequently found, which was treated surgically.
Summary
Original Article
National utilization of rib fracture fixation in the geriatric population in the United States
Jennifer M. Brewer, Leah Aakjar, Kelsey Sullivan, Vijay Jayaraman, Manuel Moutinho, Elan Jeremitsky, Andrew R. Doben
J Trauma Inj. 2022;35(3):173-180.   Published online May 31, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0076
  • 2,404 View
  • 55 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The use of surgical stabilization of rib fractures (SSRF) has steadily increased over the past decade. Recent literature suggests that a larger population may benefit from SSRF, and that the geriatric population—as the highest-risk population—may receive the greatest improvement from these interventions. We sought to determine the overall utilization of SSRF in the United States.
Methods
The National Trauma Database was analyzed between 2016 and 2017. The inclusion criteria were all patients ≥65 years old with rib fractures. We further stratified these patients according to age (65–79 vs. ≥80 years old), the presence of coding for flail chest, three or more rib fractures, and intervention (surgical vs. nonoperative management). The main outcomes were surgical interventions, mortality, pneumonia, length of stay, intensive care unit length of stay, ventilator use, and tracheostomy.
Results
Overall, 93,638 patients were identified. SSRF was performed in 992 patients. Patients who underwent SSRF had improved mortality in the 65 to 79 age group, regardless of the number of ribs fractured. We identified 92,637 patients in the age group of 65 to 79 years old who did not undergo SSRF. This represents an additional 20,000 patients annually who may benefit from SSRF.
Conclusions
By conservative standards and the well-established Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma clinical practice guidelines, SSRF is underutilized. Our data suggest that SSRF may be very beneficial for the geriatric population, specifically those aged 65 to 79 years with any rib fractures. We hypothesize that roughly 20,000 additional cases will meet the inclusion criteria for SSRF each year. It is therefore imperative that we train acute care surgeons in this skill set.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Incidence of adult rib fracture injuries and changing hospitalization practice patterns: a 10-year analysis
    Sergio M. Navarro, Rafat H. Solaiman, Jilun Zhang, Ilitch Diaz-Gutierrez, Christopher Tignanelli, James V. Harmon
    European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Case Report
Complete Transection of the Cystic Duct and Artery after Blunt Trauma: A Case Report
Sung Hoon Cho, Kyoung Hoon Lim
J Trauma Inj. 2021;34(4):294-298.   Published online December 16, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2021.0097
  • 2,881 View
  • 80 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Extrahepatic biliary tract and gallbladder injuries following blunt abdominal trauma are uncommon. Traumatic cystic duct transection is even rarer, which has frequently caused missed diagnosis and delayed treatment. An 18-year-old female patient with no past medical history was transferred to the Trauma Center of Kyungpook National University Hospital after falling from a height of approximately 20 meters. She became hemodynamically stable after initial resuscitation, and initial contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed right kidney traumatic infarction and multiple intrahepatic contusions with minimal fluid collection but no extravasation of the contrast. She was admitted to the intensive care unit. On the second day of hospitalization, her abdomen became distended, with follow-up CT showing a large collection of intra-abdominal fluid. Laparoscopic exploration was then performed, which revealed devascularization of the gallbladder with complete transection of the cystic duct and artery. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed, as well as primary closure of the cystic duct orifice on the common bile duct using a 4-0 Prolene suture. After surgery, no clinical evidence of biliary leakage or common bile duct stricture was observed.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Rare Complication of Percutaneous Transhepatic Gallbladder Drainage
    Yang-Yuan Chen, Chih-Hsuan Chen, Yung-Fang Chen
    Gastroenterology.2022; 163(5): e29.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Central Venous Catheterization before Versus after Computed Tomography in Hemodynamically Unstable Patients with Major Blunt Trauma: Clinical Characteristics and Factors for Decision Making
Ji Hun Kim, Sang Ook Ha, Young Sun Park, Jeong Hyeon Yi, Sun Beom Hur, Ki Ho Lee
J Trauma Inj. 2018;31(3):135-142.   Published online December 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2018.022
  • 3,202 View
  • 43 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose

When hemodynamically unstable patients with blunt major trauma arrive at the emergency department (ED), the safety of performing early whole-body computed tomography (WBCT) is concerning. Some clinicians perform central venous catheterization (CVC) before WBCT (pre-computed tomography [CT] group) for hemodynamic stabilization. However, as no study has reported the factors affecting this decision, we compared clinical characteristics and outcomes of the pre- and post-CT groups and determined factors affecting this decision.

Methods

This retrospective study included 70 hemodynamically unstable patients with chest or/and abdominal blunt injury who underwent WBCT and CVC between March 2013 and November 2017.

Results

Univariate analysis revealed that the injury severity score, intubation, pulse pressure, focused assessment with sonography in trauma positivity score, and pH were different between the pre-CT (34 patients, 48.6%) and post-CT (all, p<0.05) groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that injury severity score (ISS) and intubation were factors affecting the decision to perform CVC before CT (p=0.003 and p=0.043). Regarding clinical outcomes, the interval from ED arrival to CT (p=0.011) and definite bleeding control (p=0.038), and hospital and intensive care unit lengths of stay (p=0.018 and p=0.053) were longer in the pre-CT group than in the post-CT group. Although not significant, the pre-CT group had lower survival rates at 24 hours and 28 days than the post-CT group (p=0.168 and p=0.226).

Conclusions

Clinicians have a tendency to perform CVC before CT in patients with blunt major trauma and high ISS and intubation.

Summary
Treatment Option for High Grade Spleen Injury and Predictive Factors for Non-operative Management
Joung Won Na, Jung Nam Lee, Byung Chul Yu, Min A Lee, Jae Jung Park, Gil Jae Lee
J Trauma Inj. 2017;30(3):91-97.   Published online October 30, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2017.30.3.91
  • 2,129 View
  • 21 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE
The prognostic factors of non-operative management (NOM) in high-grade spleen injuries have been extensively studied, but factors that would help treatment decisions are lacking. We compared the characteristics of the patients to identify the factors affecting treatment choices.
METHODS
This is a review of 207 blunt spleen injury patients from January 2004 to December 2013. We compared clinical features and mortality between surgery and NOM, and used multivariate regression analysis to find the factor most strongly associated with prognosis.
RESULTS
Of the 207 patients, 107 had high-grade spleen injury patents (grade III or above). Of these, 42 patients underwent surgery and 65 patients underwent NOM. The mortality was 7% following surgery, 3% with NOM. The amount of packed red blood cells transfused in the first 24 hours and spleen injury grade were associated with management type, and mortality was highly associated with activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and spleen injury grade.
CONCLUSIONS
The grade of spleen injury was associated with management and mortality, so correctly assessing the spleen injury grade is important.
Summary
Case Reports
Traumatic Abdominal Wall Hernia: A Case Report
Youngro Yang, Kwangsig Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2017;30(2):70-73.   Published online June 30, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2017.30.2.70
  • 2,664 View
  • 32 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Traumatic abdominal wall hernia is a rare condition that can follow any blunt trauma to the abdomen. Generally there has been an increase in the incidence of blunt abdominal trauma, although the case of traumatic abdominal wall hernias are rare. Probably due to the elasticity of the abdominal wall for resisting the shear forces generated by a traumatic impacts. In this case, we are reporting 1 rare case, diagnosed as an abdominal wall hernia associated with herniation of bowel loops due to blunt trauma without intra-abdominal injury including peritoneum.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Traumatic abdominal wall hernia: a rare and often missed diagnosis in blunt trauma
    Sohil Pothiawala, Sunder Balasubramaniam, Mujeeb Taib, Savitha Bhagvan
    World Journal of Emergency Medicine.2022; 13(6): 492.     CrossRef
Isolated Traumatic Injury of the Pancreatic Head: A Case Report
Dong Hun Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2016;29(2):51-55.   Published online June 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2016.29.2.51
  • 2,190 View
  • 13 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Isolated injury to the pancreas after abdominal trauma is uncommon, and a delay in diagnosis and treatment can increase the morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic decisions with respect to pancreatic trauma are usually made based on the site of injury and the status of the pancreatic ductal system. In this report, we describe the surgical management of pancreatic head transection as an isolated injury following blunt abdominal trauma. A 55-year-old man presented with epigastric pain that radiated to the back. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a hematoma in the pancreatic head and upstream dilatation of the main pancreatic duct. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed complete disruption of and contrast leakage from the main pancreatic duct in the pancreatic head region with a nonenhanced upstream duct. Emergency pancreaticoduodenectomy was successfully performed, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 9 without any complications.
Summary
Endovascular Stent Placement in a Patient with a Posttraumatic Isolated Superior Mesenteric Artery Dissection with Focally Progressing Dissecting Aneurysms and a Severely Compressed True Lumen
Young Kyu Kim, Kyu Hee Her, Seung Hyoung Kim, Kwangsik Kim
J Trauma Inj. 2015;28(4):266-271.   Published online December 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2015.28.4.266
  • 2,300 View
  • 5 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Reports on a posttraumatic isolated superior mesenteric artery (SMA) dissection are rare. Recently, endovascular stent placement via percutaneous access, instead of vascular surgery, has been widely accepted as the initial treatment for a patient with an isolated SMA dissection or its complications. A 60-year-old female patient was transferred to our hospital due to an isolated SMA dissection after a car accident. The SMA dissection was 8.5 cm in length, and it involved the true lumen, which was severely compressed by the thrombosed false lumen. The patient was closely observed because she did not complain of any specific visceral pain. On the seventh hospital day, she underwent computed tomography (CT) to decide on a further treatment plan, irrespective of the presence of the abdominal symptom. The findings of the follow-up CT showed no difference compared to those of the previous CT. She was discharged with anticoagulants. One month later, the follow-up CT revealed focally progressing dissecting aneurysms in the false lumen of the dissected SMA and a more severely compressed true lumen. Two self-expandable metallic stents were successfully placed in the true lumen of the dissected SMA, covering two aneurysmal lesions. Herein, we report a successful endovascular treatment with stent placement for treating focally progressing dissecting aneurysms and a severely compressed true lumen in a patient with a posttraumatic isolated SMA dissection.
Summary
Delayed Diagnosis of Cerebral Infarction after Complete Occlusion of ICA due to Blunt Head Trauma: A Case of Report
Jung Ho Yun, Jung Ho Ko, Chun Sung Cho
J Trauma Inj. 2015;28(3):190-194.   Published online September 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.20408/jti.2015.28.3.190
  • 1,990 View
  • 6 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Blunt cerebrovascular injury is defined as a vertebral or carotid arterial structural wall injury resulting from nonpenetrating trauma. Complete traumatic internal carotid artery occlusion is very rare condition accounting for 0.08~0.4 0f all trauma patients and believed to be associated with the greatest risk of ischemic stroke reported in 50~90% in a few small series. A 55-year-male was admitted with drowsy mentality and severe headache after a fall down accident. Brain computed tomography showed a subdural hematoma at the both frontal area with a fracture of the occipital skull bone. Two days after admission, he suddenly complained with a right side hemiparesis of motor grade 2. Brain magnetic resonance diffusion demonstrated multiple high flow signal changes from the left frontal and parietal lesion. Computed tomographic angiogram (CTA) revealed absence of the left ICA flow. Trans femoral cerebral angiography (TFCA) showed complete occlusion of the left internal carotid artery (ICA) at ophthalmic segment in the left ICA angiogram and flows on the left whole hemispheric lesions through the anterior communicating artery in the right ICA angiogram. We decided to conduct close observations as a treatment for the patient because of acute subdural hematoma and sufficient contralateral cerebral flow by perfusion SPECT scan. Two weeks after the accident, he was treated with heparin anticoagulation within INR 2~4 ranges. He recovered as the motor grade 4 without another neurologic deficit after 3 months
Summary
Celiac Artery Dissection after Abdominal Blunt Trauma
Yun Suhk Suh, Seong Chun Kim, Hwan Do Ra, Ho Seong Han
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2006;19(2):196-200.
  • 1,218 View
  • 0 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
We report a case of celiac artery dissection after abdominal blunt trauma. A 29-year-old man visited the emergency room for acute left periumbilical pain after abdominal blunt trauma from his child. Computed tomography showed a wedge-shaped splenic infarction with splenic artery thrombus. He was hospitalized for careful observation, and after two days, follow-up computed tomographic angiography showed a progressed celiac artery dissection that involved common hepatic artery and an increased extent of splenic infarction. He underwent conventional angiography, and a self-expandable stent was placed between the celiac axis and the common hepatic artery. After two days, follow-up computed tomographic angiography showed good hepatic arterial blood flow via the stent and no progression of splenic infarction. After ten days, he was discharged without complications.
Summary
A Case of Neobladder Rupture Following Blunt Trauma
Young Hoon Sul, Moon Haeng Lee, Sang Il Lee, Kwang Sik Cheon, In Sang Song
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2012;25(3):101-104.
  • 14,689 View
  • 4 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Bladder rupture following blunt trauma is rare, and no neobladder rupture following blunt trauma has yet been reported. We present a case of neobladder rupture following blunt trauma. The patient was a 65-year-old male patient who had been treated for bladder cancer via a radical cystectomy with an orthotopic ileal neobladder four years prior to this admission, and who was admitted to our emergency department due to multiple trauma after a 1.5 m fall. Primary repair was performed for the neobladder rupture.
Summary
Duodenal Injury after Blunt Abdominal Trauma: Report of Two Cases
Ki Hoon Kim
J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2012;25(3):94-96.
  • 1,105 View
  • 2 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Duodenal injuries following a blunt or penetrating trauma are uncommon and account for just 3% to 5% of all abdominal injuries. About 22% of all duodenal injuries are caused by blunt trauma. An overlooked injury or delayed diagnosis of duodenal injury may lead to increased mortality and morbidity. We report two cases of a duodenal injury following blunt abdominal trauma.
Summary

J Trauma Inj : Journal of Trauma and Injury